Thus Spake Zarathustra

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FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

THUS SPAKE ZARATHUSTRA

A BOOK FOR ALL AND NONE

TRANSLATED BY THOMAS COMMON

CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION BY MRS FORSTER-NIETZSCHE.

THUS SPAKE ZARATHUSTRA.

FIRST PART.

Zarathustra's Prologue.

Zarathustra' Discourses.

I. The Three Metamorphoses.

II. The Academic Chairs of Virtue.

III. Backworldsmen.

IV. The Despisers of the Body.

V. Joys and Passions.

VI. The Pale Criminal.

VII. Reading and Writing.

VIII. The Tree on the Hill.

IX. The Preachers of Death.

X. War and Warriors.

XI. The New Idol.

XII. The Flies in the Market-place.

XIII. Chastity.

XIV. The Friend.

XV. The Thousand and One Goals.

XVI. Neighbour-Love.

XVII. The Way of the Creating One.

XVIII. Old and Young Women.

XIX. The Bite of the Adder.

XX. Child and Marriage.

XXI. Voluntary Death.

XXII. The Bestowing Virtue.

SECOND PART.

XXIII. The Child with the Mirror.

XXIV. In the Happy Isles.

XXV. The Pitiful.

XXVI. The Priests.

XXVII. The Virtuous.

XXVIII. The Rabble.

XXIX. The Tarantulas.

XXX. The Famous Wise Ones.

XXXI. The Night-Song.

XXXII. The Dance-Song.

XXXIII. The Grave-Song.

XXXIV. Self-Surpassing.

XXXV. The Sublime Ones.

XXXVI. The Land of Culture.

XXXVII. Immaculate Perception.

XXXVIII. Scholars.

XXXIX. Poets.

XL. Great Events.

XLI. The Soothsayer.

XLII. Redemption.

XLIII. Manly Prudence.

XLIV. The Stillest Hour.

THIRD PART.

XLV. The Wanderer.

XLVI. The Vision and the Enigma.

XLVII. Involuntary Bliss.

XLVIII. Before Sunrise.

XLIX. The Bedwarfing Virtue.

L. On the Olive-Mount.

LI. On Passing-by.

LII. The Apostates.

LIII. The Return Home.

LIV. The Three Evil Things.

LV. The Spirit of Gravity.

LVI. Old and New Tables.

LVII. The Convalescent.

LVIII. The Great Longing.

LIX. The Second Dance-Song.

LX. The Seven Seals.

FOURTH AND LAST PART.

LXI. The Honey Sacrifice.

LXII. The Cry of Distress.

LXIII. Talk with the Kings.

LXIV. The Leech.

LXV. The Magician.

LXVI. Out of Service.

LXVII. The Ugliest Man.

LXVIII. The Voluntary Beggar.

LXIX. The Shadow.

LXX. Noon-Tide.

LXXI. The Greeting.

LXXII. The Supper.

LXIII. The Higher Man.

LXXIV. The Song of Melancholy.

LXXV. Science.

LXXVI. Among Daughters of the Desert.

LXXVII. The Awakening.

LXXVIII. The Ass-Festival.

LXXIX. The Drunken Song.

LXXX. The Sign.

APPENDIX.

Notes on "Thus Spake Zarathustra" by Anthony M. Ludovici.

INTRODUCTION BY MRS FORSTER-NIETZSCHE.

HOW ZARATHUSTRA CAME INTO BEING.

"Zarathustra" is my brother's most personal work; it is the history of his most individual experiences, of his friendships, ideals, raptures, bitterest disappointments and sorrows. Above it all, however, there soars, transfiguring it, the image of his greatest hopes and remotest aims. My brother had the figure of Zarathustra in his mind from his very earliest youth: he once told me that even as a child he had dreamt of him. At different periods in his life, he would call this haunter of his dreams by different names; "but in the end," he declares in a note on the subject, "I had to do a PERSIAN the honour of identifying him with this creature of my fancy. Persians were the first to take a broad and comprehensive view of history. Every series of evolutions, according to them, was presided over by a prophet; and every prophet had his 'Hazar,'--his dynasty of a thousand years."

All Zarathustra's views, as also his personality, were early conceptions of my brother's mind. Whoever reads his posthumously published writings for the years 1869-82 with care, will constantly meet with passages suggestive of Zarathustra's thoughts and doctrines. For instance, the ideal of the Superman is put forth quite clearly in all his writings during the years 1873-75; and in "We Philologists", the following remarkable observations occur:--

"How can one praise and glorify a nation as a whole?--Even among the Greeks, it was the INDIVIDUALS that counted."

"The Greeks are interesting and extremely important because they reared such a vast number of great individuals. How was this possible? The question is one which ought to be studied.

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